Wednesday, October 04, 2006

It's Not Easy Being Greens

At least not at our house. They don't last very long.

When we first moved here Jay conducted a very rigorous experiment to determine what we should plant in our garden...he went to the feed store and watched what other people were buying. The answer? Kale and turnips.

Of course at that point our garden didn't even exist, so he headed out with his hoe and his seeds and made one. This is what it looks like today, complete with the world's best gardening-helper.
You can see my pile of greens that I cut on the left.
And here's what happened to them about five minutes later.

I'll let you know how they turn out.

10 comments:

Kat E said...

Yum! My garden was totally pathetic this year. I finally got some beautiful zucchini plants growing, but the birds and/or squirrels get to the squash well before I do! The one plant that fared well was my oregano--it came back by itself and grew like crazy :)

Jennifer said...

I love that opening... so clever! I wonder if everyone in the region buys kale and turnips just because everyone in the region buys kale and turnips? There may be no other reason. You could be the first people in West Tennessee to rebel against root vegetables and plant something wild like...I don't know, spinach? I would say that judging from the photo, you have the cutest little farmhand in town.

anna said...

I think Joshua's look is too cute...it appears he's thinking..."I have to eat that?!"

How fun to have a garden! And I think that is the only picture of kale I've ever seen that actually looked appetizing.

TLS said...

Kale is yummy!! Actually greens in general are very good. Josh and I like to cook them southern style with a little bacon, onion, vinegar and sugar to taste. You have to cook them way down...not like spinach. Greens are slow cooking food.

Mary Beth said...

So they did turn out pretty well. This is only the third "mess" I've ever cooked. The best one was the one I cooked for 8 hours in a pile of country ham. I only used onions this time since we were out of country ham and hog jowl. I supposed I could've used bacon. We don't add the vinegar and hot sauce until after. I've never tried adding sugar!

Anonymous said...

What do you mean you didn't use bacon?!? I thought you were from the South? Have been faking the accent all this time?

Mary Beth said...

OK, Dave, cut me some slack :) You of all people know the learning curve I've had to climb to actually have a meal on the table every night. I promise, just for you, I'll use bacon next time!

TLS said...

Do you mean "cottage ham" or "country ham?"

Growing up we had this bizarre meat product which was called "cottage ham." You boiled it for 8 hours in greens beans and onions. Last winter I craved it and went in search throughout Boston for this mysterious meat. No one had heard of it.

So, when my parents came to visit I had them bring us one.

The meat was unrecognizable. All the label said was "cottage ham." We have no idea what it actually is....do you think it could be the same thing as "country ham?"

Mary Beth said...

According to the Hormel website, they are different. We had a Kentucky ham, but from the looks of it cottage ham is not the same.

Mary Beth said...

For anyone still reading, I cooked a mess of greens with ham hock for eight hours today. They were definitely the best I've made so far.