Thursday, October 19, 2006

Put a Cork In It

I was sitting in Jason's today having lunch with my friend R. Our friend B and her two charges had just left, so R and I were sitting on the same side of the table facing the door.

Out of the blue, R said, matter-of-factly, "There's Bob Corker."

"What?" I asked incredulously.

She nodded towards the door--"There's Bob Corker. I knew he was campaigning in town this week but I thought he'd already left."

For those of you not keeping up with Tennessee politics, the senate race here is tight. So tight, in fact, that I've actually heard it covered on NPR several times over the past few weeks.

We sat and waited for him to approach us. As he walked toward our table, R, knowing my political leanings, leaned over and said, "Now, be nice."

He held out his hand. "Bob Corker."

We introduced ourselves.

He told us he hoped we'd consider voting for him in the election.

"Indeed!" I said. (Sure, I'll consider it one more time, when I step in the voting booth.)

He started to walk away and then came back.

"So," he said, obviously uncomfortable, "what's the talk about the election around here."

I answered, "I was just telling R here that I'd heard about the race on NPR several times over the last few weeks. I guess it's pretty close if they're covering it on the national news."

"Well," he replied, "I hope I can count on you to help put me over the top."

R and I smiled.

We noticed throughout the rest of out lunch that he spent considerably longer with the other patrons than he did with us. We also noticed that most of the other patrons were about the age of our parents. At some of the tables he sat down, and at most of them he at least engaged in some sort of conversation.

Jay's opined that he assumed R and I were a lesbian couple out with our child (He didn't even mention Joshua or even look at him, by the way).

But my dad confirmed my suspicion, which is that Corker's pretty certain he doesn't have the 30-something female vote anyway, so there's no use wasting time trying to convince us otherwise. And dad said that if Corker had any hope that he might have our vote, my mention of "NPR" killed it.

You'd think he'd at least engage us in some conversation. It was obvious that at least one of us was a mom. Why not tell us about his position on education? On taxes? On something? But, as my dad said, "He's worried about getting my vote. Not yours."

To tell you the truth, I'm going to be holding my nose as I pull the lever on election day anyway.

It was interesting to watch and to be part of. Jay and I both decided my dad was right about why Corker was so standoff-ish, but Jay's suggestion made us laugh a lot.

5 comments:

TLS said...

NPR?? No self-respecting member of the right listens to thatliberal crap! It was a dead give away!!

Politics is all about efficiency. You don't want every vote, just enough to get you elected.

I must say you are very kind. I am working on my kindness and restraint. Josh says I need to be less direct and learn to speak like a southern woman, kind but cutting. So, I enlisted the help of my friend from Memphis, who worships the play/movie "Steel Magnolias" and has a hadle on how I can learn to get along with my southern relatives.

Kat E said...

This reminds me of last weekend--I went with a friend to one of those skin-care-product-home-parties, which happened to be held at the home of the salesperson's parents. I was initially creeped out by all the Catholic paraphernalia on the walls, but the icing on the cake was when the father walked through the living room, looked at all of us, then looked at his daughter and said "I hope they're all Republicans!"

martha said...

I bet even if your dad is right, Jay is too...you should've done the fake-make-out.

Jennifer said...

LOL at Martha!

What kind of politician would pass up kissing such a beautiful baby?!

Mary Beth said...

TLS--
Politics is all about efficiency. You don't want every vote, just enough to get you elected.
This was my dad's wisdom as well. Why bother talking to the two young women when you already know they think you're a knob.

I must say you are very kind. I am working on my kindness and restraint. Josh says I need to be less direct and learn to speak like a southern woman, kind but cutting.
Ah, yes, the fine art of insulting someone without letting them know they've just been insulted. I think I could afford to be a little less restrained and a little more confrontational (Patrick, are you reading this? If so, I know you're laughing). I'll have to post the joke that Tim G. from BU used to tell me--it sums up your point perfectly.

Martha and Jennifer--Looking back on it, I should have at least gotten R to hold my hand!